Tag Archives: Alimony

Is Living With Your Best Friend’s Brother Considered Cohabitation?

In the world of New Jersey family law, cohabitation is a term of art. It involves a mutually supportive, intimate, personal relationship where parties share the duties, responsibilities and privileges typically associated with marriage. Said another way, it is a relationship that has the hallmarks of marriage, but without the marriage ceremony. Evidence is Key…

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What should you think about if considering a divorce?

  While each case is different, there are general issues every client must contemplate when considering a divorce in New Jersey. Custody & Parenting Time The first and foremost consideration is if there are any children of the marriage. If so, the issues of custody and parenting time must be addressed. There are two different…

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Tax Issues for Divorced or Separated Individuals

The IRS, Publication 504, outlines a host of tax filing requirements for people who are married or separated when filing their annual tax returns. You are considered divorced for the entire year if you are divorced on any day in a given tax year. This is true even if you got divorced on December 31. …

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What is a Marital Settlement Agreement?

  The main goal of every divorce case is to reach an agreement with your spouse. A Marital Settlement Agreement, written and signed by both spouses, is a contract that defines the terms of their divorce. Depending on the issues in your case, the Marital Settlement Agreement must address a variety of issues. First, custody…

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What does imputation of income mean?

  In a New Jersey divorce, it is crucial to know the income of both parties.  It is equally important to know what each is capable of earning. The income of the parties must be known in order to resolve issues like alimony and child support. In many divorces, however, the income-producing spouse suddenly acquires…

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Alimony Basics in New Jersey

Generally speaking, alimony is often the hardest part of my job. Unlike child support, there are no alimony guidelines. Alimony is based on statutory factors and case law interpreting these factors. 12 New Jersey statutory factors: The actual need and ability of the parties to pay. The duration of the marriage. The parties’ age, physical…

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